How Do I Fix Redirect Error 2?

You may come across an error code indicating a redirection error 2. There are several ways to fix this, so we’ll look at them shortly.

2> & 1 means STDERR redirects to the preferred STDOUT directory (this is the declared directory listing). We redirect the result of the error to standard output, which is redirected to the save directory listing on Switch. Hence, both outputs to the list directory.

Some Tips For Redirecting

Certain syntax features in this context may indicate important behavior. Here are some examples of forwarding, STDERR , STDOUT , and then the order of the arguments.

1 – Add Overwrite Also?

  • > means submit as a completely overwritten and finalized file, destination if available (see Bash noclobber function for # 3 later).
  • >> send also means that the target can be added to an existing instance.

How do you redirect an error?

To redirect stderr (standard error) to a file: Command 2> Error.txt.Let’s change focus to both stderr and stdout: manage &> output.txt.Finally, we can immediately redirect stdout to a file named myoutput.txt and then redirect stderr – stdout with 2> & 1 (errors.txt):

In any case, the file will probably be created if it doesn’t exist.

2 – Shell Command Line Dependent !!

What does 2 >& 1 mean and when is it typically used?

4 reviews. Sie is standard output (stdout). All three indicate standard error (stderr). So 2> & 1 tells you to send standard errors if you want to navigate to where you are currently migrating The standard output is edited.

To test this, we need this simple command that sends all sorts of things to both outputs:

  $ ls -ld / tmp / tntls: no access to / tnt: no, this type of file or directorydrwxrwxrwt 118 root core 196608 Jan, 11:49 2011 Energy Tax Credit / tmp$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt> / dev / nullls: usually no access / tnt: no such file and directory$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt 2> / dev / nulldrwxrwxrwt 118 root root 19660 Jan 8, 11:49 7 / tmp 

(Assuming you don’t have a directoryand named / tnt , classes;). Well, we have it !!

  $ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt> / dev / nullls: not available / tnt: tel no file, also known as directory$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt> / dev / null 2> & 1$ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt 2> & 1> / dev / nullls: no access to / tnt: no content or directory 

The last command line brings STDERR to the console and that doesn’t seem to be the required behavior … But …

If you would like to help filter out standard results, output errors, or both:

  $ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt | sed 's /^.*$/<-- & ---> /'ls: no access to / tnt: no, this file or directory<- drwxrwxrwt 118 original root 196608 January pair 12:02 / tmp --->$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt 2> & 1 Sed | 's /^.*$/<-- & ---> /'<- ls: no access / tnt: no form file or directory ---><- drwxrwxrwt 118 root cause 196608 Jan around 12:02 / tmp --->$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt> / dev / null | sed 's /^.*$/<-- & ---> /'ls: unable to access / tnt: not like this or directory of files$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt> / dev / null 2> & 1 | zed 's /^.*$/<-- & ---> /'$ ls -ld / tmp / tnt 2> & 1> / dev / null Sed | 's /^.*$/<-- & ---> /'<- ls: no access / tnt: no file or directory ---> 

Note the fact that the last command line of the paragraph is exactly the same as in the previous paragraph,which I wrote, it doesn’t seem like the expected thought patterns (so it might even be the expected behavior).

Well, there are several secrets and several rejection methods to perform certain operations on both outputs:

  $ (mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt | zed 's / ^ / O: /'> & 9) 9> & 2 2> & 1 | sed 's / ^ / E: /'О: drwxrwxrwt 118 root root 196608 Jan 7 12:13 pm / tmpE: ls: can't get / tnt: no such file or possibly directory 

Appendix: note! The newer version of Bash (> 4.0 ) has some cool features and syntax to do things like this:

  $ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt 2 >> (sed 's / ^ / E: /') >> (sed 's / ^ / O: /')O: drwxrwxrwt on the seventeenth root root 28672 Nov 5 23:00 / tmpE: ls: cannot use / tnt: no such file or directory 
  $ ((ls -ld / tmp / tnt | sed 's / ^ / O: /'> & 9) 2> & 1 | sed 's / ^ / E: /') 9> & 1 | Cat -n     1 О: drwxrwxrwt 118 root root 196608 Jan 7 12:29 pm / tmp     2 E: ls: access to / tnt: no such file, potentially directory 

redirect error 2

  $ cat -n <(ls -ld / tmp / tnt 2 >> (sed 's / ^ / E: /') >> (sed 's / ^ / O: /')))     1 O: drwxrwxrwt Teen Root Root 28672 Nov 20, 23:00 / tmp     just E: ls: cannot directly access / tnt: no such file in addition to directory 

Where STDOUT goes through a specific AC filter, STDERR goes to another, and the two combined outputs at the end go through the last command filter.

3 – A Few Words About The Noclobber Parameter And The > Syntax |

What does 2 >& 1 at the end of a command do?

means distraction. & 1 uses the first file descriptor to indicate that the redirection destination should be in the same location; Standard H.! So> / dev / null 2> & 1 first redirects stdout to / dev / null, then stderr also redirects there. This will disable all output (normal or possible errors) from the wget command.

Although set -o noclobber tells bash not to overwrite an existing file, you can usually use the syntax > | before this limitation:

  $ testfile = $ (mktemp / tmp / testNoClobberDate-XXXXXX)$> $ test file reached; Chat test file $Mon 6 Jan 13:18:15 CET 2013$> Jump $ testfile; Chat test file $Read much more Jan 13:18:19 CET 2013$> today $ test file; Chat test file $Mon, 7 January 01:18:21 PM CET 2013 
  $ set -o noclobber$> Date of $ test file; Kitten $ test filebash: / tmp / testNoClobberDate-WW1xi9: existing file cannot be overwrittenMon, 7 January 01:18:21 PM CET 2013$> a specific test file $; Chat test file $bash: / tmp / testNoClobberDate-WW1xi9: unable to overwrite existing fileMon, 7 January 01:18:21 PM CET 2013 
  $> date | $ test file; Chat test file $Mon 7 Jan 01:18:58 CET 2013$> Date | $ test file; Chat test file $Mon, 7 amJanuary 13:19:01 CET 2013 

redirect error 2

  $ set - | grep noclobbernobody is on$ set + o noclobber$ affected by -o | grep noclobbernoclobber away$> moment $ test file; Chat test file $Mon 8 Jan, 13:24:27 GMT 2013$ rm $ test file 

4 – The Last Circle And More …

By redirecting the two outputs of a given command, people can see that the correct syntax could certainly be:

  $ ls -ld / tmp / tnt> / dev / null 2> & 1 

For this particular case, there is literally the syntax: Shortcut &> … ni > &

  $ ls -ld / tmp / tnt &> / dev / null$ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt> & / dev / null 
  $ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt 2> / dev / null now 1> and 2 

4b- I’ll Let You Guess:

  $ ls -ld / tmp / tnt 2> & 1 1> & 2 | sed -e s / ^ / ++ /++ / bin / ls: no access to / tnt: no such file or only directory++ drwxrwxrwt 193 root root 196608 Feb 9 11:08 / tmp /$ mark vii -ld / tmp / tnt 1> & 2 2> & 1 | zed -e s / ^ / ++ // bin / ls: no access to / tnt: no such file or directorydrwxrwxrwt 193 main root 196608 Feb 11:08 / tmp / 

4c- If You’re Interested, More Information

  man -Len -Pless  + / ^ REDIRING bash 

Oshibka Perenapravleniya 2
Redireccionar Error 2
Omleidingsfout 2
Erreur De Redirection 2
Blad Przekierowania 2
Umleitungsfehler 2
Erro De Redirecionamento 2
리디렉션 오류 2
Omdirigeringsfel 2
Errore Di Reindirizzamento 2

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